Epilepsy

/ˈɛpɪlɛpsi/ From late Latin/Greek epilēpsia, epilambanein ‘seize’, epi ‘upon’.

Epilepsy is a brain disease characterized by abnormal electrical activity that causes seizures or unusual behaviors and sensations, and sometimes loss of consciousness, which has neurological, cognitive, psychological and social consequences

Definition by OMS / ILAE / IBE

Epilepsy is a global issue

65

is the estimated number of people around globe who live with epilepsy.

410

of people diagnosed with epilepsy in the United States. 87 new daily epilepsy cases in the United Kingdom.

33

live with uncontrollable seizures because no available treatment works for them.

mjn-neuro has developed a solution to help people with epilepsy

Discover our project
WHO calls for urgent action

Epilepsy, a public health imperative

This report presents encouraging evidence that almost a quarter of epilepsy cases are preventable and 70% of people with epilepsy can live seizure free with low-cost and effective medicines. As evidence from multiple countries shows, it is feasible to integrate epilepsy into primary health care and thereby ensure that all people with epilepsy have access to quality and affordable treatment and services. Read more 🡢

The social burden of epilepsy

Roughly half of adults with epilepsy have at least one other health condition. Psychiatric conditions, such as depression and anxiety, make seizures worse and reduce quality of life. Epilepsy has significant economic implications in terms of health care needs and lost productivity at work.

Stigma and discrimination

In all parts of the world, people with epilepsy are the target of discrimination and human rights violations. The stigma of epilepsy can discourage people from seeking treatment and has consequences for quality of life and social inclusion. Improving knowledge and raising awareness of epilepsy in schools, work places, and communities is needed to reduce stigma.

Treatment gap

Three-quarters of people living with epilepsy in low-income countries do not get the treatment they need. Yet, up to 70% of people with epilepsy could become seizure free with appropriate use of costeffective antiseizure medicines.

Prevention

An estimated 25% of epilepsy cases are preventable. The major modifiable risk factors for epilepsy are: perinatal insults, central nervous system infections, traumatic brain injury and stroke. Preventing epilepsy is an urgent unmet need.

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Stigma

Many fight the disease in silence to avoid being rejected from society, which is sadly common due to lack of knowledge of the disease


Between 20% and 55% of people with epilepsy also suffer from depression, but only a small portion are diagnosed and treated.

 Source: European Journal of Epilepsy

Uncertainty and epilepsy, a strong correlation

It is impossible to know when a crisis will occur, how long it will last and what negative effects it may have, this in many cases generates depression and anxiety in the patient, aggravating the risk of suffering a crisis.

Epilepsy is a neurological condition of psychosocial reach

For people with epilepsy, social anxiety affects their quality of life. Regardless of who experiences social anxiety, the disorder can have multiple dramatic consequences, including isolation, loss of self-esteem and a deteriorated lifestyle.

WHAT PEOPLE SEE

Society, generally, we associate seizures as the only consequence of the disease.

WHAT PEOPLE SEE

Society, generally, we associate seizures as the only consequence of the disease.

WHAT IT REALLY IS

Epilepsy, but, has many more consequences that hinder the quality of life of those who suffer from it. Generalized social stigma makes it difficult for those affected to communicate what they feel.

WHAT IT REALLY IS

Epilepsy, but, has many more consequences that hinder the quality of life of those who suffer from it. Generalized social stigma makes it difficult for those affected to communicate what they feel.

Exploding myths about epilepsy

Touch the items to reveal explanation  

FALSE
Epilepsy is a mental illness

It is wrong to assume someone with epilepsy has a physical disorder as epilepsy itself is not a mental illness.

FALSE
Epilepsy is a rare disease

According to the WHO, 50,000,000 people in the world suffer epilepsy. This means that one in 100 is affected.

FALSE
Flashing lights cause epilepsy

Light flashes only affect people suffering photosensitive epilepsy, which usually affects children and young people. Lights alone do not cause epilepsy.

FALSE
An epileptic seizure causes violent convulsions

There are different degrees of seizures. There are, for example, partial ones, which do not cause loss of consciousness and may even go unnoticed.

FALSE
Epilepsy is contagious through physical contact

There are genetic and physical factors, among others, that can lead to epilepsy, but never physical contact with other people.

FALSE
You should put something in a person’s mouth to stop them from swallowing their tongue during a seizure

It is physically impossible to swallow your tongue. You can harm yourself or the person’s teeth, jaw and mouth if you try to force something into their mouth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQd4vRTBToI
mjn-neuro and epilepsy

“Hi, I’m Marina and I’ve had epilepsy for 13 years”

Watch Marina and mjn-neuro's co-founders explain the project

Personal motivation,
aiming for global results

Marina is one of the daughters of David Blánquez, co-founder and CEO of mjn-neuro. The involvement of mjn-neuro with the affected group goes beyond technology, conceiving its value in a social environment.

There are many stories of lives fighting epilepsy

We want to share the knowledge of those who know best. In this section you will be able to access lectures or content provided by renowned epileptologists.

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